Scoundrel Time

Author-Test

Erica Baum

Erica Baum

Erica Baum, New York. Recent museum exhibitions include Photo-Poetics: An Anthology, Kunsthalle Berlin and Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, and Reconstructions: Recent Photographs and Video from the Met Collection, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Recent solo exhibitions include The Following Information, Bureau, New York, 2016, and Stanzas, Galerie Crevecoeur, Paris, 2015. Selected biennials include AGORA 4th Athens Biennale, Athens, 2013, and the 30th Bienal de São Paulo: The Imminence of Poetics, São Paulo, Brazil, 2012. Publications include Erica Baum, The Naked Eye, 2015 Crèvecœur/œ Paris & Bureau New York, and second edition hard cover Dog Ear, 2016 Ugly Duckling Presse.

Tony Eprile

Tony Eprile

Tony Eprile grew up in South Africa, where his father was the editor of the first multiracial mass-circulation newspaper, The Golden City Post, and of Drum Magazine. His novel, The Persistence of Memory, was a New York Times Notable Book of the Year and won the Koret Jewish Book prize. He recently completed a memoir about his family’s move from South Africa to England, God Save Your Bloody Queen, and is working on a new novel. His articles and book reviews have appeared in The Nation, Gourmet, the Washington Post, The New York Times, and elsewhere, and his photographs have appeared in a variety of magazines. He lives in Bennington, VT.

Aaron Anstett

Aaron Anstett

Aaron Anstett lives in Colorado with his wife, Lesley, and children. When not in motion, technical editing, or fretting, he tries to write poems for a new manuscript, State the Nature of Your Emergency.

Rachel McKibbens

Rachel McKibbens

Rachel McKibbens is a two-time New York Foundation for the Arts poetry fellow and author of three books of poetry, blud, Into The Dark & Emptying Field, and Pink Elephant. In 2012, McKibbens founded "The Pink Door Women’s Writing Retreat," an annual writing retreat open exclusively to women of color. McKibbens is a member of Latinas Unidas and co-curates the critically acclaimed reading series Poetry & Pie Night in upstate New York.

Elizabeth Rosner

Elizabeth Rosner

Elizabeth Rosner is a bestselling novelist, poet, and essayist living in Berkeley, California. Her first book of nonfiction, SURVIVOR CAFÉ: The Legacy of Trauma and the Labyrinth of Memory, was published in September 2017 and has been featured on National Public Radio and in The New York Times. Her third novel, ELECTRIC CITY, published in 2014, was named among the best books of the year by NPR. Her poetry collection, GRAVITY, was also published in 2014. THE SPEED OF LIGHT, Rosner's acclaimed debut novel in 2001, was translated into nine languages. Short-listed for the prestigious Prix Femina, the book won several literary prizes in both the U.S. and Europe, including the Prix France Bleu Gironde; the Great Lakes Colleges Award for New Fiction; and Hadassah Magazine's Ribalow Prize, judged by Elie Wiesel. BLUE NUDE, her second novel, was selected as one of the best books of 2006 by the San Francisco Chronicle. Rosner’s essays and poems have appeared in the NY Times Magazine, Elle, the Forward, and several anthologies. She travels widely to lead intensive writing workshops, lecture on contemporary literature, and visit with book groups. Her book reviews appear frequently in the San Francisco Chronicle. Website: www.elizabethrosner.com

Jeanne Larsen

Jeanne Larsen

Jeanne Larsen is the author of two books of poetry, Why We Make Gardens [& other Poems] (Mayapple Press, 2010) and James Cook in Search of Terra Incognita (AWP series winner; U. of Virginia Press, 1979), as well as two of literary translations, Willow, Wine, Mirror, Moon: Women’s Poems from Tang China (BOA Editions, Ltd. 2005) and Brocade River Poems: Selected Works of the Tang Dynasty Courtesan Xue Tao (Princeton U. Press 1987). She has also published an e-novel, and three print novels. She teaches in the MFA and BA programs of the Jackson Center for Creative Writing at Hollins University.

Cally Conan-Davies

Cally Conan-Davies

Cally Conan-Davies hails from the island of Tasmania. Her poems have appeared in The Hudson Review, Subtropics, Poetry, Quadrant, The New Criterion, Virginia Quarterly Review, The Sewanee Review, Southwest Review, The Dark Horse, Harvard Review, Hopkins Review, and many online journals. She lives by the sea.

Karen E. Bender

Karen E. Bender

Karen E. Bender is the author of the story collection Refund, which was a Finalist for the National Book Award in Fiction in 2015 and shortlisted for the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Prize. She is also the author of the novels A Town of Empty Rooms and Like Normal People. Her fiction has appeared in magazines including The New Yorker, Granta, Ploughshares, Guernica, The Harvard Review, and Zoetrope and has been reprinted in Best American Short Stories, Best American Mystery Stories, and New Stories from the South; she has also won two Pushcart prizes. Her stories have been read on the Selected Shorts program on NPR; she has received grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Rona Jaffe Foundation. She is Distinguished Visiting Professor of Creative Writing at Hollins University.

Peter Trachtenberg

Peter Trachtenberg

Peter Trachtenberg is the author of 7 Tattoos (1997), The Book of Calamities: Five Questions About Suffering and Its Meaning (2008), and Another Insane Devotion (2012), a New York Times Book Review Editor’s Choice. His essays, journalism, and short fiction have been published in The New Yorker, Harper’s, BOMB, TriQuarterly, O: The Oprah Magazine, The New York Times Travel Magazine, A Public Space, the L.A. Review of Books, the Virginia Quarterly Review, and StoryQuarterly. His commentaries have been broadcast on NPR’s All Things Considered. Trachtenberg is an Associate Professor of English at the University of Pittsburgh and part of the core faculty at the Bennington Writers Seminars. His awards include Guggenheim and Whiting Fellowships and the Nelson Algren Award for Short Fiction. The Book of Calamities was given the 2009 Phi Beta Kappa Society’s Ralph Waldo Emerson Award “for scholarly studies that contribute significantly to interpretations of the intellectual and cultural condition of humanity.”

Mebane Robertson

Mebane Robertson

Mebane Robertson earned his B.A. from The College of William and Mary and his Ph.D. from Fordham University. He’s the author of two books of poetry, Signal from Draco (2007) and An American Unconscious (2016), both from Commonwealth Books. His poems have appeared in Guernica, The William and Mary Review, The Journal, Beloit Poetry Journal, Able Muse, and elsewhere. He lives in Brooklyn.

Alissa Quart

Alissa Quart

Alissa Quart is the Executive Editor and co-founder of the non-profit Economic Hardship Reporting Project. She is also the author of four books including Branded, Republic of Outsiders, and the poetry book Monetized (Miami University Press). Her next non-fiction book will be published in 2018 by Ecco/HarperCollins. She is also a columnist for The Guardian. Her poetry has appeared in the London Review of Books, The Awl, NPR, Columbia Journalism Review, Day One, The Offing and many other publications.

Susan Gubernat

Susan Gubernat

Susan Gubernat’s second collection, The Zoo at Night, won the Prairie Schooner poetry book prize from the University of Nebraska and will be published in September 2017. Her previous book, Flesh, won the Marianne Moore Prize and was published by Helicon Nine Editions. She has published a chapbook (Analog House: A Cabinet of Curiosities, Finishing Line Press), and a number of her poems have appeared in literary journals, including Cimarron Review, Crab Orchard Review, Gargoyle, Michigan Quarterly, and Pleiades. She has been a fellow in residence at MacDowell, Yaddo, the Virginia Center for the Arts, and the Millay Colony and is the recipient of fellowships from both the New York and the New Jersey state arts councils. She teaches in the English Department of California State University, East Bay

Dana Sachs

Dana Sachs

Dana Sachs is the author of four books -- the novels If You Lived Here and The Secret of the Nightingale Palace, and two books of nonfiction, The Life We Were Given: Operation Babylift, International Adoption, and The Children of War in Vietnam and The House on Dream Street: Memoir of an American Woman in Vietnam. Her articles, reviews, and essays have appeared in many publications, including National Geographic, The Wall Street Journal, Travel and Leisure Family, The International Herald Tribune, and Mother Jones. She teaches in the Honors College at UNC-Wilmington and is currently at work on a book about the refugee situation in Greece. Sachs is one of the founders of Humanity Now: Direct Refugee Relief.

Philip Hoover

Philip Hoover

Philip Hoover was born in Chicago, Illinois to poets Maxine Chernoff and Paul Hoover. A graduate of the UT Austin MFA film program, Philip has worked for McSweeney’s Publishing in San Francisco, as a correspondent for the Oakland Tribune, and currently as script coordinator on the CW series iZombie. His comedy web-series Language Academy will be out in March, 2017.

Mikhail Iossel

Mikhail Iossel

Mikhail Iossel is the author of the story collection Every Hunter Wants to Know (W.W. Norton), and co-editor of the anthologies Amerika: Russian Writers View the United States (Dalkey Archive, 2004) and Rasskazy: New Fiction from a New Russia (TinConcordia University in Montreal House, 2010). He is a professor of English/Creative Writing at Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, and the founding director of the Summer Literary Seminars international program. Among his awards are the Guggenheim, NEA, and Stegner Fellowships. He was born in Leningrad.

Suzanne Bottelli

Suzanne Bottelli

Suzanne Bottelli’s work has appeared in Poetry Northwest, The Literary Review, and Prairie Schooner, among others, and is forthcoming in The Collagist. Her chapbook, The Feltville Formation (Finishing Line Press), was published in 2015. She teaches Humanities and Writing at The Northwest School in Seattle, WA.

W. Ralph Eubanks

W. Ralph Eubanks

W. Ralph Eubanks is the author of Ever Is a Long Time: A Journey Into Mississippi’s Dark Past and The House at the End of the Road: The Story of Three Generations of an Interracial Family in the American South. His essays and criticism have appeared in the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, The American Scholar, NPR, WIRED, and The New Yorker, and he is the former editor of the Virginia Quarterly Review at the University of Virginia. A 2007 Guggenheim Fellow, he will be a visiting professor of English and Southern Studies at the University of Mississippi for the 2017 to 2018 academic year.

Hillary Jordan

Hillary Jordan

Hillary Jordan is the author of the novels Mudbound (2008) and When She Woke (2011) and the digital short “Aftermirth” (2012), all published by Algonquin Books. The two novels have been translated into over a dozen languages. Mudbound won multiple awards, including the Bellwether Prize for socially conscious fiction. It was adapted into a film that made its world premiere at Sundance in January 2017 and is now on Netflix. The film has been nominated for four Academy Awards in 2018, including Best Adapted Screenplay.

Hillary has a BA from Wellesley College and an MFA in Creative Writing from Columbia. She lives in Brooklyn, NY, along with half the writers in America.

Maria Saba

Maria Saba

An Ottawa-based writer, storyteller, and arts educator, Maria Saba was born and raised in Iran. She has published three books and over a hundred articles, interviews, and stories. “My First Friend,” her short story published in Scoundrel Time, is nominated for the Pushcart Prize. Maria is the recipient of grants in English literature from Canada Council from the Arts, Ontario Arts Council, and the City of Ottawa. She is currently working on her second collection of short stories about the aftermath of the 1979 Iranian revolution. Her website: mariasaba.ca

Carolyn Alessio

Carolyn Alessio

Carolyn Alessio is the recipient of an NEA fellowship in creative writing and a Pushcart Prize. She is prose editor for Crab Orchard Review at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, and her novel manuscript, El Favorito, was a finalist for the PEN/Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction.

Dee Shapiro

Dee Shapiro

Dee Shapiro has been exhibiting work in New York since the late 1970s. Her work is included in the S.R. Guggenheim Museum, The Everson Museum, The Albright Knox Gallery, as well as in museums and corporate and private collections in the US and abroad. She teaches studio art and art history at Empire State College SUNY, Old Westbury. Her poems and essays have been published in Heresies, Confrontation, Chiron Review, as well as in other small presses. She lives and works on Long Island and in Connecticut.

Sean Micah

Sean Micah is a fashion, portrait, and documentary photographer, and retoucher based out of New York. Website: SeanMicah.co

Mark Svenvold

Mark Svenvold

Mark Svenvold, author of Empire Burlesque and Big Weather, teaches creative writing at Seton Hall University and lives in New York City.

Rachel Hadas

Rachel Hadas

Rachel Hadas is the author of more than a dozen books of poetry, essays, and translations. Her latest poetry volume is Questions in the Vestibule (Northwestern Univ. Press 2016), and she is currently completing verse translations of Euripides' two Iphigenia plays. A Board of Governors Professor of English at Rutgers-Newark, she is currently working with her husband, the video artist Shalom Gorewitz, on a poetry and video collaborative project: The Rachel and Shalom Show.

Dave Singleton

Dave Singleton

Dave Singleton is a writer, editor and author of three books, including CRUSH: Writers Reflect on Love, Longing, and the Lasting Power of Their First Celebrity Crush (Harper Collins 2016). He covers pop culture, relationships, health, and LGBT life, and is a regular columnist for Caring.com. His work has appeared in The Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, PBS’s Next Avenue, AARP Media, Yahoo, MSN, the BBC, Washingtonian, Harper’s Bazaar, Huffington Post, OUT magazine, and Scoundrel Time.

His honors include the 2010 Media Industry Award for Outstanding Writing, the GLAAD Award for Outstanding Multimedia Journalism, and two National Lesbian and Gay Journalists Association “Excellence in Online Journalism” awards.

He lives in Washington, D.C. and teaches creative nonfiction and memoir at The Writer’s Center. Visit his website for more of his work, and follow him on Twitter @DCDaveSingleton.

Cody Walker

Cody Walker

Cody Walker’s third poetry collection, The Trumpiad (Waywiser Press), will be published on April 29, 2017, the last of Trump’s first 100 days in office. All proceeds will be donated to the ACLU. More information may be found at codywalker.net.

Katrina Roberts

Katrina Roberts

Katrina Roberts is the author of four books of poems: Underdog; Friendly Fire; The Quick; and How Late Desire Looks; as well as editor of the anthology: Because You Asked: A Book of Answers on the Art & Craft of the Writing Life (finalist for CLMP’s Firecracker Award in Creative Nonfiction, named one of the “Best Books for Writers” by Poets & Writers.) Her work appears in places such as The Pushcart Prize Anthology, Best American Poetry, The Bread Loaf Anthology of New American Poets, Short Takes: Brief Encounters with Contemporary Creative Nonfiction, the Academy’s Poem-A-Day; Verse Daily, and elsewhere. She teaches at Whitman College, where she curates the Visiting Writers Reading Series. With Jeremy Barker, she started Walla Walla Distilling Company, the first craft distillery in southeastern Washington state; they live on a small farm with their three children.

Jill McDonough

Jill McDonough

Jill McDonough is the author of Habeas Corpus (Salt, 2008), Oh, James! (Seven Kitchens, 2012), Where You Live (Salt, 2012), and Reaper (Alice James, 2017). The recipient of three Pushcart prizes and fellowships from the Lannan Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Fine Arts Work Center, the New York Public Library, the Library of Congress, and Stanford’s Stegner program, she taught incarcerated college students through Boston University’s Prison Education Program for thirteen years. Her work has appeared in Poetry, Slate, The Nation, The Threepenny Review, and Best American Poetry. She teaches in the MFA program at UMass-Boston and directs 24PearlStreet, the Fine Arts Work Center online. Her fifth poetry collection, Here All Night, is forthcoming from Alice James Books.

Kamden Ishmael Hilliard

Kamden Ishmael Hilliard

Kamden is a reader at Gigantic Sequins, an editor at Jellyfish Magazine, and goes by Kam. They got posi vibes from The Ucross Foundation, The Davidson Institute, and Callaloo. The author of two chapbooks: DISTRESS TOLERANCE (Magic Helicopter Press, 2016) and PERCEIVED DISTANCE FROM IMPACT (Black Lawrence Press, 2017), Kam stays busy. Find their work in The Black Warrior Review, West Branch, Salt Hill, and other sunspots.

Carolyn Ferrell

Carolyn Ferrell

Carolyn Ferrell is the author of the story collection Don't Erase Me, which won the L.A. Book Times Award for First Fiction. She is a recipient of grants from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Bronx Council on the Arts. Ferrell teaches at Sarah Lawrence College and lives in New York with her husband and children.

Hilene Flanzbaum

Hilene Flanzbaum

Hilene Flanzbaum is a poet, non-fiction writer, and literary critic who has published her work in Ploughshares, Tikkun, O!, the Massachusetts Review, American Literary History, and Studies in American Jewish Literature, among many others. She lives in Indianapolis where she teaches at Butler University and directs the MFA program.

Regie Cabico

Regie Cabico

Regie Cabico won the Nuyorican Poets Café and produces Capturing Fire: A Queer Spoken Word Slam. His work appears in Poetry, Beltway Poetry Quarterly, 2 Bridges Review & Painted Bride Quarterly, among others. He coedited Flicker & Spark (Low Brow Press), which received a Lambda Literary Award Nomination. He received the Barnes & Noble Writers for Writers Award and A New York Innovative Theater Award for his work on Too Much Light Makes The Baby Go Blind. He resides in Washington, DC, where he is Resident Teaching Artist at The Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

Wendy Richmond

Wendy Richmond

Wendy Richmond is a multimedia visual artist and writer. She is the recipient of a MacDowell Colony Fellowship, a Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center residency, an American Academy in Rome Visual Artist residency, an NEA grant, a LEF Foundation grant, and the Hatch Award for Creative Excellence. She has taught at Harvard University, the International Center of Photography, and Rhode Island School of Design. Richmond’s books include Design & Technology: Erasing the Boundaries, Overneath: a collaboration of dance & photography, and Art without Compromise*. Her regular column Design Culture has appeared in Communication Arts magazine since 1984. Find her online at www.wendyrichmond.com.

Sebastian Agudelo

Sebastian Agudelo

Sebastian Agudelo is the author of two books of poetry, Each Chartered Street and To The Bone which was selected by Mark Doty as the winner of the 2008 Saturnalia Book Prize. His poems have appeared in The Nation, Antioch Review, The Manchester Review, Boston Review Online and At Length Magazine, among others. He lives in Philadelphia with his wife and daughter.

Cheney Crow

Cheney Crow

Cheney Crow is an applied linguist, translator, activist and writer. Her poems have appeared in The Cortland Review, Tupelo Quarterly, International Poetry (translation), Terminus, Human Equity Through Art (HEArt), and others. The University of Texas, where she taught French Linguistics, brought her to Austin, where she now works for voter education, human rights, and political change. In non-election years, she travels.

Sean Webb

Sean Webb

Sean Webb has been recipient of fellowships from The Arizona Commission on the Arts and the Utah Arts Council, and was awarded the Passages North Neutrino prize. He was selected by Grace Paley to serve as Poet Laureate of Montgomery County Pa. in 2005. His chapbook, The Constant Parades, was recently selected by Afaa Weaver as a runner-up in the Moonstone Poetry chapbook competition and his work has appeared in Prairie Schooner, North American Review, Nimrod, Mudfish, The Quarterly, and many other journals and anthologies.

Donald Riggs

Donald Riggs

Don Riggs has been writing verse for over half a century, some of which he hopes reach the level of poetry.

Fady Joudah

Fady Joudah

Fady Joudah has published four collections of poems, The Earth in the Attic, Alight, a book-long sequence of short poems composed on a cell phone, Textu, whose meter is cellphone character count; and, most recently, Footnotes in the Order of Disappearance. He has translated several collections of poetry from the Arabic. He was a winner of the Yale Series of Younger Poets competition in 2007 and has received a PEN Translation Award, a Banipal/Times Literary Supplement Prize from the UK, the Griffin Poetry Prize, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. He lives in Houston, with his wife and kids, where he practices internal medicine.

Caroline Leavitt

Caroline Leavitt

Caroline Leavitt is the author of the Indie Next Pick Cruel Beautiful World, the New York Times Bestsellers Is This Tomorrow and Pictures of You, and 8 other novels. A book critic for The Boston Globe, People Magazine, and the San Francisco Chronicle, she teaches novel writing online at UCLA Writers Program Extension and at Stanford. Her essays and stories have appeared in The New York Times’ Modern Love, Real Simple, The Millions, and more. She can be reached at www.carolineleavitt.com.

Bob Holman

Bob Holman

Bob Holman is a powerfully influential force in American letters, especially in the areas of Spoken Word, Slam, and performative poetry. He has edited or co-edited numerous anthologies, including The United States of Poetry, Aloud: Voice from the Nuyorican Poets Café, and Spoken Word Revolution, and was the co-founder of Mouth Almighty Records. Recent film and video work include the PBS production of “Language Matters with Bob Holman,” "DeAf Jam,” a documentary of American sign language poets, and “On the Road: Three Documentaries on Endangered Languages.” Recent collections of poetry include Sing This One Back to Me and Picasso in Barcelona. He lives in New York City.

Sarah Browning

Sarah Browning

Sarah Browning is co-founder and Executive Director of Split This Rock: Poetry of Provocation & Witness and an Associate Fellow of the Institute for Policy Studies. Author of two collections of poems, Killing Summer and Whiskey in the Garden of Eden, and co-editor of D.C. Poets Against the War: An Anthology, she is the recipient of artist fellowships from the DC Commission on the Arts & Humanities, a Creative Communities Initiative grant, and the People Before Profits Poetry Prize. She has been guest editor or co-edited special issues of Beltway Poetry Quarterly, The Delaware Poetry Review, and POETRY magazine. Since 2006, Browning has co-hosted the Sunday Kind of Love poetry series at Busboys and Poets in Washington, DC.

Khabir Cory

Khabir Cory lives and works in the U.S. and has been writing all his life. He uses a pen name to protect the privacy of those who didn’t ask to be part of his unusual journey.

Tony Hoagland

Tony Hoagland

Tony Hoagland's latest collections of poems are Recent Changes in the Vernacular (Tres Chicas Books, 2017), and the forthcoming Priest Turned Therapist Treats Fear of God (Graywolf Press, June, 2018). He lives part time in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and teaches at the University of Houston.

Ben Greenman

Ben Greenman

Ben Greenman is a New York Times-bestselling author who has written both fiction and nonfiction. He is the author of several acclaimed works of fiction, including the novel The Slippage and the short-story collections What He’s Poised to Do and Superbad. He is the co-author of the bestselling Mo' Meta Blues with Questlove; the bestselling I Am Brian Wilson with Brian Wilson; Brothas Be, Yo Like George, Ain't That Funkin' Kinda Hard on You? with George Clinton; and more. His fiction, essays, and journalism have appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times, the Washington Post, the Paris Review, Zoetrope: All Story, McSweeney’s, and elsewhere, and have been widely anthologized. His most recent book is Emotional Rescue, a collection of music essays; his next book will be Dig If You Will The Picture, a meditation on the life and career of Prince.

Janice Shapiro

Janice Shapiro

Janice Shapiro is the author of Bummer and Other Stories (Soft Skull Press, 2010). Her stories and comics have been published in The Rumpus, Catapult, The North American Review, 52 Stories, The Santa Monica Review, Everyday Genius, Real Pants, and elsewhere. She is finishing a graphic memoir, Crushable–My Life In Crushes From Ricky Nelson to Viggo Mortensen. Janice lives in Berkeley, California with her husband and mostly well-behaved dog.

Ashley Jones

Ashley Jones

Ashley M. Jones received an MFA in Poetry from Florida International University (FIU), where she was a John S. and James L. Knight Foundation Fellow. She received a 2015 Rona Jaffe Foundation Writer’s Award and a 2015 B-Metro Magazine Fusion Award. Her debut poetry collection, Magic City Gospel, was published by Hub City Press in January 2017, and it won the silver medal in poetry in the 2017 Independent Publishers Book Awards. Her second book, dark // thing, won the 2018 Lena-Miles Wever Todd Prize for Poetry from Pleiades Press. She currently lives in Birmingham, Alabama, where she is founding director of the Magic City Poetry Festival, a board member of the Alabama Writers’ Conclave , co-coordinator of the Nitty Gritty Magic City Reading Series, and a faculty member in the Creative Writing Department of the Alabama School of Fine Arts. (ashleymichellejones.wordpress.com)

Julie Upshur

Julie Upshur

Julie Upshur graduated summa cum laude from Austin Peay State University. She is currently pursuing her MFA in creative writing at Hollins University, where her thesis combines her love for fiction and her love for the intense three-phase equestrian sport of eventing. She makes her home in Nashville, TN, with her parents and nine brothers and sisters.

Christine Mallon

Christine Mallon

Christine Mallon received her B.A. and M.A. in English (with a creative writing concentration) from Seton Hall University. Since then, she has worked in the publishing industry and is currently an adjunct English professor at Seton Hall University.

Karen Brennan

Karen Brennan

Karen Brennan is the author of seven books of varying genres, including new fiction, Monsters (Four Way Books, 2016). Her fiction, poetry, and nonfiction have appeared in anthologies from Norton, Penguin, Graywolf, Spuyten Duyvil, Michigan, Georgia, and others. A National Endowment of the Arts recipient, she is Professor Emerita at the University of Utah and teaches at the Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers. She holds a Ph.D. from University of Arizona.

Erin Hoover

Erin Hoover

Erin Hoover is the author of Barnburner, selected by Kathryn Nuernberger for the Antivenom Poetry Award and forthcoming in 2018 from Elixir Press. Her poems have appeared in the 2016 edition of The Best American Poetry, and most recently in Narrative, The Awl, and Alaska Quarterly Review. She lives in Tallahassee, Florida. Her website is erinhooverpoet.com.

Reginald Dwayne Betts

Reginald Dwayne Betts

Reginald Dwayne Betts is a Ph. D. in Law candidate at Yale and Emerson Fellow at New America. He holds a B.A. from the University of Maryland and a J.D. from Yale Law School, where he was awarded the Israel H. Perez Prize for best student note or comment appearing in the Yale Law Journal He spent his summers with the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the District of Columbia’s Public Defender Service. He has worked in the New Haven Public Defender’s Office as a Liman Fellow.

Prior to law school, Dwayne was a Radcliffe Fellow at Harvard’s Radcliffe Institute of Advanced Studies and a Soros Justice Fellow. In addition, he served by appointment of former President Barack Obama as a practitioner member of the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. The author of three books, Betts’ latest collection of poems, Bastards of the Reagan Era, has been named the winner of the Pen New England Poetry Prize. His first collection of poems, Shahid Reads His Own Palm, won the Beatrice Hawley Award. Betts’ memoir, A Question of Freedom: A Memoir of Learning, Survival, and Coming of Age in Prison, was the recipient of the 2010 NAACP Image Award for non-fiction.

The poems published at Scoundrel Time will appear in Felon: A Misspelling of My Name, forthcoming from Norton.

Tracy O'Neill

Tracy O'Neill

Tracy O'Neill is the author of The Hopeful. In 2015, she was named a National Book Foundation 5 Under 35 honoree, long-listed for the Flaherty-Dunnan Prize, and was a Narrative Under 30 finalist. In 2012, she was awarded the Center for Fiction's Emerging Writers Fellowship. Her fiction has appeared in Granta, LitHub, Vol. 1 Brooklyn, The Literarian, New World Writing, Narrative, and Guernica. She has published nonfiction in The Atlantic, The New Yorker, Bookforum, Rolling Stone, Grantland, Vice, The Guardian, VQR, and the San Francisco Chronicle. Her column Body Language appears in Catapult. She currently teaches at the City College of New York and is pursuing a PhD at Columbia University.

Regan Good

Regan Good

Regan Good is a poet and writer living in Brooklyn, New York. She teaches poetry writing peripatetically at FIT, Barnard College, SUNY Purchase, and the Poet’s House. Her book of poems, The Atlantic House, was published in 2012. She is currently working on a memoir about growing up in Westport, Connecticut before it was a hedge fund farm. (Photo by Marion Ettlinger)

Karen and Jim Shepard

Karen and Jim Shepard

For biographical information, please see individual listings under "Karen Shepard" and "Jim Shepard."

Carsten René Nielsen

Carsten René Nielsen

Carsten René Nielsen is a Danish poet. His selected prose poems, The World Cut Out with Crooked Scissors, was published in English by New Issues in the United States in 2007, and in 2011 House Inspections—the English translation of his prose poems Husundersøgelser (2008)—was published by BOA Editions, both books translated by the American poet David Keplinger. In the United States his poems have been featured in several magazines, among them The Paris Review, Circumference, Agni and Copper Nickel. His new collection, Enogfyrre Ting (Forty-one Objects), in which “Toothpaste” appears, was published by Ekbatana in 2017.

Roy White

Roy White

Roy White is a blind person who lives in Saint Paul, Minnesota with a lovely human and an affable lab mix. His work has appeared, or is about to, in Poetry, BOAAT Journal, Baltimore Review, Tinderbox, and elsewhere, and he blogs at lippenheimer.wordpress.com.

Jim Daniels

Jim Daniels

Jim Daniels’ next books of poems, Rowing Inland, Wayne State University Press, and Street Calligraphy, Steel Toe Books, will both be published in 2017. He is the Thomas Stockham University Professor of English at Carnegie Mellon University.

Virginia Beards

Virginia Beards

Virginia Beards taught British and European literature for 23 years at the Brandywine Campus of Penn State University. She has published a poetry collection, Exit Pursued by a Bear (Oermead Press, 2014), short fiction in Chester County Fiction (Oermead Press, 2011), contributed to the literary criticism industry, and re-discovered and edited a 19th century novel, The Real Charlotte, for Rutgers University Press. She is currently completing Inside the Kaleidoscope, a poetry collection. She has an M.A. from the University of Pennsylvania, a PhD from Bryn Mawr College, and lives on a farm in Pennsylvania’s Lancaster county where her praxis is writing, dressage, and keeping one step ahead of the vagaries of nature and her two criminal dogs.

Rose Auslander

Rose Auslander

Rose Auslander’s book Wild Water Child won the 2016 Bass River Press Poetry Contest, and her chapbooks include Folding Water, Hints, and The Dolphin in the Gowanus. She is poetry Editor of Folded Word Press and earned her MFA in Poetry from Warren Wilson.

Paul Lisicky

Paul Lisicky

Paul Lisicky is the author of five books: The Narrow Door (a New York Times Editors' Choice), Unbuilt Projects, The Burning House, Famous Builder, and Lawnboy. His work has appeared in The Atlantic, BuzzFeed, Conjunctions, Fence, The New York Times, The Offing, Ploughshares, Tin House, and in many other magazines and anthologies. His awards include fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown, where he was twice a Fellow. He teaches in the MFA Program at Rutgers University-Camden. In Fall 2018, he will be the visiting writer at the University of Texas-Austin.

Matthew Olzmann

Matthew Olzmann

Matthew Olzmann is the author of two collections of poems, Mezzanines, which was selected for the Kundiman Prize, and Contradictions in the Design, both from Alice James Books. He’s received fellowships from Kundiman, the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, and the Kresge Arts Foundation. His writing has appeared in the Kenyon Review, the New England Review, Brevity, The Southern Review, and elsewhere. Currently, he teaches at Dartmouth College and in the MFA Program for Writers at Warren Wilson College.

Melody Moezzi

Melody Moezzi

Melody Moezzi is a writer, activist, attorney and award-winning author. Her latest book is Haldol and Hyacinths: A Bipolar Life. Moezzi is also Visiting Assistant Professor of Creative Nonfiction at UNC Wilmington, a United Nations Global Expert, an Opinion Leader for the British Council's Our Shared Future initiative, a blogger for The Huffington Post and Ms. Magazine, as well as a regular columnist and blogger for bp Magazine. Her writing has appeared in The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Guardian and many other outlets.

Elizabeth Cohen

Elizabeth Cohen

Elizabeth Cohen is an associate professor of English at SUNY Plattsburgh and the editor of Saranac Review. She is the author of The House on Beartown Road, a memoir; The Hypothetical Girl, a book of short stories; and six books of poetry, most recently Bird Light, published by Saint Julian Press, among other works. She lives in upstate New York with her daughter Ava and way too many cats. You can find more about her and her work here.

Tara Campbell

Tara Campbell

Tara Campbell is an assistant fiction editor at Barrelhouse and MFA candidate at American University. Prior publication credits include SmokeLong Quarterly, Masters Review, b(OINK), Booth, Spelk, Litbreak, and Queen Mob's Teahouse. Her debut novel, TreeVolution, was published in 2016, and her collection, Circe's Bicycle, will be released in fall 2017.

Suzanne Cloud

Suzanne Cloud

Suzanne Cloud, writer, historian, and jazz singer appearing with Philadelphia’s top musicians, received her doctorate from the University of Pennsylvania in American Studies. Cloud has authored six young-adult history books, contributed to the African-American National Biography Project at Harvard, writes frequently to the Philadelphia Inquirer, and is executive director of Jazz Bridge, a nonprofit aiding musicians in crisis. Her play Last Call at the Downbeat was part of the 2013 Philadelphia International Festival of the Arts. Cloud, a past Commonwealth Speaker for the Pennsylvania Humanities Council and recipient of the Rutgers University Chancellor’s Award for Civic Engagement in 2015, conceptualized Vision Song: Our Hearts, Our Future, Our Voices, a commission for jazz orchestra for Kimmel Center performances April 2016. Cloud has recorded critically acclaimed albums on the Dreambox label, which recently reissued her political 1995 release With a Little Help from My Friends. For more info: suzannecloud.net

Charlee Brodsky

Charlee Brodsky

Charlee Brodsky, a fine art documentary photographer and a professor of photography at Carnegie Mellon University, describes her work as dealing with social issues and beauty. In 2012, she was chosen by Pittsburgh Center for the Arts as Pittsburgh’s Artist of the Year. Her awards include the Tillie Olsen Award with writer Jim Daniels for their book, Street; an Emmy with the film team that created the documentary Stephanie, which is based on her friend’s life with breast cancer; the Pearl of Hope award given by Sojourner House for her work with students in the Pittsburgh community; and two Pennsylvania Council on the Arts fellowships. Additionally, the Society for Photographic Education, Mid-Atlantic Region, named her the 2014 Honored Educator. Her notable books include I Thought I Could Fly… Portraits of Anguish, Compulsion, and Despair, a work that features her photographs and narratives of mental illness; and Knowing Stephanie, authored with Stephanie Byram and J. Matesa. You can find her at www.charleebrodsky.com.

Johnny Horton

Johnny Horton

Johnny Horton lives in Seattle where he walks dogs and teaches literature to veterans. He also teaches poetry classes at Hugo House and directs the University of Washington's summer creative writing program in Rome. He's recently published poems in Poetry Northwest, The Los Angeles Review, CutBank, Horsethief, and City of the Big Shoulders: An Anthology of Chicago Poetry.

Ellen McGrath Smith

Ellen McGrath Smith

Ellen McGrath Smith teaches at the University of Pittsburgh and in the Carlow University Madwomen in the Attic program. Her writing has appeared in The American Poetry Review, Los Angeles Review, Quiddity, Cimarron, and other journals, and in several anthologies, including Beauty Is a Verb: The New Poetry of Disability. Smith has been the recipient of an Orlando Prize, an Academy of American Poets award, a Rainmaker Award from Zone 3 magazine, and a 2007 Individual Artist grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts. Her second chapbook, Scatter, Feed, was published by Seven Kitchens Press in the fall of 2014, and her book, Nobody's Jackknife, was published in 2015 by the West End Press.

Jennifer Sears

Jennifer Sears

Jennifer Sears’ stories have appeared in Electric Literature’s Recommended Reading Sears, Guernica, Witness, Mid-Western Gothic, Fiction International, Ninth Letter, Fence, and other publications. Recipient of a 2018 Creative Writing Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts, she has also received awards from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation, the Money for Women Fund, Summer Literary Seminars, and distinction in Best American Short Stories 2016. She is Assistant Professor of English at New York City College of Technology (CUNY). Photo by AFQ Photography.

Hilma Wolitzer

Hilma Wolitzer

Hilma Wolitzer’s most recent novel is An Available Man. Her poems have appeared in New Letters, Ploughshares, and Prairie Schooner. The first vote she ever cast was for Adlai Stevenson.

Daniel Menaker

Daniel Menaker

Daniel Menaker, former fiction editor at The New Yorker and Editor-in-Chief of Random House, is the author of seven books. He teaches in the MFA program at Stony Brook University.

Carole Burns

Carole Burns

Carole Burns’s collection, The Missing Woman and Other Stories, was awarded the 2015 John C. Zacharis First Book Award by Ploughshares. Burns also writes book reviews and author interviews for The Washington Post. Her non-fiction book, Off the Page: Writers Talk About Beginnings, Endings, and Everything in Between, published by W.W. Norton in 2008, was based on interviews with 43 writers including A.S. Byatt, Anthony Doerr, Edward P. Jones, and Jhumpa Lahiri. She’s working on a novel.

Robyn Ringler

Robyn Ringler

Robyn Ringler is a nurse, lawyer, and writer in upstate New York. After her experience as President Ronald Reagan’s nurse at the George Washington University Hospital in 1981, following the assassination attempt, she became an outspoken gun control activist and served on the board of New Yorkers Against Gun Violence. In 2015, she earned an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Tampa. Her writing has appeared in Heavy Feather Review and Yellow Chair Review, in the anthologies Women’s Letters: America from the Revolutionary War to the Present and Stories of Illness and Healing: Women Write Their Bodies, and on NPR and Martha Stewart Radio. Ringler owns East Line Literary Arts, through which she teaches creative writing to all ages.

Gabrielle Brant Freeman

Gabrielle Brant Freeman

Gabrielle Brant Freeman's poetry has been published in many journals, most recently in Barrelhouse, Cider Press Review, Grist, One, Rappahannock Review, storySouth, and Waxwing. She was nominated twice for the Best of the Net, and she was a 2014 finalist. Gabrielle won the 2015 Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition. Press 53 published her first book, When She Was Bad, in 2016. Gabrielle earned her MFA through Converse College.

Cynthia Dewi Oka

Cynthia Dewi Oka

Cynthia Dewi Oka is a poet and the author of Salvage (Northwestern University Press, 2017) and Nomad of Salt and Hard Water (Thread Makes Blanket, 2016). A three-time Pushcart Prize Nominee, her poems have appeared in American Poetry Review, Kenyon Review, Guernica, The Massachusetts Review, Black Renaissance Noire, Painted Bride Quarterly, and elsewhere. Among other anthologies, her work has been selected for Best of Kweli, Women of Resistance: Poems for a New Feminism (OR Books, 2018), and Who Will Speak for America? (Temple University Press, 2018). She has received the Fifth Wednesday Journal Editor's Prize in Poetry, scholarships from Voices of Our Nations (VONA) and the Vermont Studio Center, and the Leeway Foundation Transformation Award. Originally from Bali, Indonesia, she currently works as an organizer with immigrant communities in Philadelphia.

Thomas Rayfiel

Thomas Rayfiel

Thomas Rayfiel is the author of seven novels, most recently In Pinelight, which the Minneapolis Star-Tribune called "a tour-de-force" and Bookforum named "one of this year's hidden gems," and Genius, which Kirkus Reviews called "...morbidly funny conversation." More information about him can be found at thomasrayfiel.com.

Rachel Ann Brickner

Rachel Ann Brickner

Rachel Ann Brickner is a writer and multimedia storyteller from Pittsburgh. Currently, she's an Arts and Sciences Graduate Fellow in fiction in the MFA program at the University of Pittsburgh where she's at work on her first novel and a memoir about debt. Her fiction and essays have appeared in PANK, Corium Magazine, Word Riot, Burrow Press Review, and elsewhere.

Tom Daley

Tom Daley

Tom Daley leads writing workshops at the Online School of Poetry and in the Boston area at the Boston Center for Adult Education and Lexington Community Education. Recent publications include Claudius Speaks, Oyster River Pages, Amsterdam Quarterly, and museum of americana. His book, House You Cannot Reach: Poems in the Voice of My Mother and Other Poems, is available from FutureCycle Press: http://www.futurecycle.org/index.php/en/catalog/by-author/item/227-tom-daley.

Peycho Kanev

Peycho Kanev

Peycho Kanev is the author of 4 poetry collections and two chapbooks, published in the USA and Europe. His poems have appeared in many literary magazines, such as: Poetry Quarterly, Evergreen Review, Front Porch Review, Hiram Poetry Review, Hawaii Review, Barrow Street, Sheepshead Review, Off the Coast, The Adirondack Review, Sierra Nevada Review, The Cleveland Review and many others. He has three nominations for the Pushcart Prize.

Valerie Block

Valerie Block

Valerie Block is the author of three novels of contemporary comic fiction, Was It Something I Said? (SoHo Press, 1998), None of Your Business (Ballantine Books, 2003), and Don’t Make a Scene (Ballantine Books, 2007). Her newest novel, Quid Pro Quo, is an ancient historical thriller about status anxiety and the corruption of power, set in the court of Caligula, the third Emperor of Rome. Born and raised in New York City, Block received a BA from Barnard College and an MFA in creative writing from Columbia University’s School of the Arts. She has been a fellow at Hawthornden International Retreat for Writers, and a visiting artist at the American Academy in Rome. She lives with her husband and son in Montclair, NJ, teaches at the Adult School of Montclair, blogs at www.valerieblock.com, and tweets at @vblock12.

T. Clear

T. Clear

T. Clear is a founder of Floating Bridge Press and the Easy Speak open mic series in Seattle. She has been writing and publishing since the late 1970’s, and her work has appeared in many magazines, including Atlanta Review, Poetry Northwest, Cascadia Review, Fine Madness, Crab Creek Review and is forthcoming in Terrain and Common Ground Review. Her work has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize and for the Independent Best American Poetry Award.

Amanda Newell

Amanda Newell

Amanda Newell is the author of the poetry chapbook Fractured Light (Broadkill Press). She won the 2015 Patricia Dobler Poetry Award, judged by Lynn Emanuel, and her work has appeared in Bellevue Literary Review, Gargoyle, Pittsburgh Poetry Review, storySouth, The Summerset Review, War, Literature & the Arts, Zone 3, and elsewhere. The recipient of scholarships to the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference and The Frost Place, she holds an MFA in Poetry from Warren Wilson College.

Kristen Iskandrian

Kristen Iskandrian

Kristen Iskandrian's debut novel MOTHEREST (Twelve/Hachette) was long-listed for the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize, and a Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2017. She is the recipient of an O. Henry Prize, and her short stories have appeared in McSweeneys, Ploughshares, Zyzzyva, Joyland, Crazyhorse, Tin House, and many other places. She lives in Birmingham, Alabama.

Terese Svoboda

Terese Svoboda

Terese Svoboda's recent books of poetry are Professor Harriman's Steam Air-Ship (Eyewear Press, 2016) and When The Next Big War Blows Down The Valley: Selected and New Poems (Anhinga Press, 2015). Her nonfiction book, Anything That Burns You: A Portrait of Lola Ridge, Radical Poet, was published by Schaffner Press in 2016.

Raqi Syed

Raqi Syed

Raqi Syed is an American writer and visual effects artist living and working in Wellington, New Zealand. She has held positions at Weta Digital and Disney, and she worked on films such as Avatar, The Hobbit, and The Planet of the Apes. Her essays have appeared in Motherboard, Salon, Quartz, and TechCrunch. She lectures on film and media at The School of Design at Victoria University of Wellington. You can follow Raqi on Twitter at @hydroxandhorlix.

Cathryn Hankla

Cathryn Hankla

Born in the Appalachian Mountains of Virginia, Cathryn Hankla is department chair and professor of English & Creative Writing in the Jackson Center for Creative Writing at Hollins University. She also serves as Poetry editor of The Hollins Critic. Hankla has published thirteen books of fiction and poetry, including Fortune Teller Miracle Fish: stories, Great Bear, and Galaxies. Her first work of nonfiction, Lost Places: on losing and finding home, will be published next spring.

Martha Zweig

Martha Zweig

Martha Zweig’s latest collection, Get Lost, winner of the 2014 Rousseau Prize for Literature, is forthcoming from The National Poetry Review Press. Previous collections include: Monkey Lightning, Tupelo Press 2010; Vinegar Bone (1999) and What Kind (2003), both from Wesleyan University Press, and Powers, 1976, a chapbook from the Vermont Arts Council. She has received a Whiting Award, Hopwood Awards, Pushcart and Best-of-the-Net nominations, and has published most recently in SLICE; SPILLWAY, INNISFREE and SUPERSTITION REVIEW.

Carolyne Wright

Carolyne Wright

Carolyne Wright co-edited, along with M.L. Lyons and Eugenia Toledo, the anthology Raising Lilly Ledbetter: Women Poets Occupy the Workspace (Lost Horse Press Human Rights Series, 2015). Her other poetry collections include Mania Klepto: The Book of Eulene (Turning Point, 2011); and A Change of Maps (Lost Horse Press, 2006). She is currently an affiliate faculty member for the Antioch University Los Angeles MFA Program and lives in Seattle, Washington.

Michael Morse

Michael Morse

Michael Morse lives in Brooklyn, NY and teaches at the Ethical Culture Fieldston School and the Iowa Summer Writing Festival. His first book, Void and Compensation, was a finalist for the Kate Tufts Discovery Prize in 2016.

Walt Whitman

Walt Whitman

Ryan Rivas

Ryan Rivas

Ryan Rivas is the Publisher of Burrow Press. His work has appeared in Literary Hub, Best American Nonrequired Reading 2012, decomP, Paper Darts and elsewhere.

Uche Ogbuji

Uche Ogbuji

Uche Ogbuji, born in Calabar, Nigeria, lived in Egypt, England, and elsewhere before settling near Boulder, Colorado. A computer engineer and entrepreneur by trade, his poetry chapbook, Ndewo, Colorado (Aldrich Press), is a Colorado Book Award Winner and a Westword Award Winner ("Best Environmental Poetry"). His poems, published worldwide, fuse Igbo culture, European classicism, American Mountain West setting, and Hip-Hop. He co-hosts the Poetry Voice podcast, is featured in the Best New African Poets anthology, and was shortlisted for Nigeria's Eriata Oribhabor Poetry Prize.

Liu Xia

Liu Xia

Liu Xia is a Chinese poet and artist. She is the author of Empty Chairs: Selected Poems (Graywolf Press), with translations into English by Ming Di and Jennifer Stern. Her poems have also been published by PEN America, Chinese PEN, the BBC, the Guardian, the Margins for the Asian American Writers’ Workshop, Poetry, the Poetry Society of America, and Words without Borders. Liu Xia’s photographs have appeared in galleries throughout the world.

Jennifer Stern is an American poet who has lived in China.

Ming Di was born in China and lives in the United States as a poet and translator. She is the co-founder and executive editor of Poetry East West, a Chinese-English bilingual literary journal. She is the Senior Editor of Translation at Tupelo Quarterly and the co-founder and chief editor of DJS BOOKS, an imprint of Red Hen Press. Publications of her poetry include six books in Chinese published by major Chinese presses, a selection of her work translated into English titled River Merchant’s Wife (Marick Press/USA, 2012), and translations of her work into German and Spanish. She edited and co-translated New Cathay: Contemporary Chinese Poetry (Tupelo Press, 2013), and has translated several English language poets into Chinese. With co-translator Jennifer Stern, she edited and translated Empty Chairs: Selected Poems by Liu Xia.

Author Image by: http://inliniedreapta.net/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/liu1.jpg

Joan Silber

Joan Silber

Joan Silber is the author of eight books of fiction, most recently the novel, Improvement, listed as one of the year’s best books by The Washington Post, Newsday, The Seattle Times, and The Wall Street Journal. Improvement is a finalist for the NBCC Award in Fiction. Her previous book, Fools, was longlisted for the National Book Award and a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award. Other works include The Size of the World, finalist for the LA Times Fiction Prize, and Ideas of Heaven, finalist for the National Book Award and the Story Prize. She teaches at Sarah Lawrence College and in the Warren Wilson MFA Program.

Sarah Van Arsdale

Sarah Van Arsdale

Sarah Van Arsdale’s book-length narrative poem, The Catamount, is forthcoming in April, 2017, from Nomadic Press. Her fourth book of fiction, In Case of Emergency, Break Glass, a collection of novellas, was published in April, 2016, by Queen’s Ferry Press. Her poetry, essays, short fiction and book reviews have been published in a variety of journals including Guernica, Passages North, The Poetry Miscellany, The Widener Review, and Episodic. She curates BLOOM: The Reading Series at Hudson View Gardens in New York City and teaches in the Antioch University MFA Program and at NYU.

Leonard Kress

Leonard Kress

Leonard Kress has published poetry and fiction in Massachusetts Review, Iowa Review, American Poetry Review, Harvard Review, etc. His recent collections are Braids & Other Sestinas, Walk Like Bo Diddley, and a new verse translation of the Polish Romantic epic, Pan Tadeusz by Adam Mickiewicz He teaches philosophy and religion Owens College in Ohio and edits creative non-fiction for Artful Dodge.

Brendan Grady

Brendan Grady

Brendan Grady has published poems in The Collagist and The New England Review. He received his MFA from the Warren Wilson Program for Writers and lives in Philadelphia.

David L. Ulin

David L. Ulin

David L. Ulin is the author, most recently, of the novel Ear to the Ground. A 2015 Guggenheim Fellow, his other books include Sidewalking: Coming to Terms with Los Angeles, shortlisted for the PEN/Diamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay, and the Library of America’s Writing Los Angeles: A Literary Anthology, which won a California Book Award.

Mariya Taher

Mariya Taher

Mariya Taher has worked in the gender violence field for nearly nine years in the areas of research, policy, program development, and direct service. She received her Master in Social Work from San Francisco State University in 2010 and has worked on the issue of domestic violence at W.O.M.A.N., Inc.; Asian Women’s Shelter; and Saheli, Support and Friendship for South Asian Women and Families. She was a 2014 Women’s Policy Institute Fellow for The Women’s Foundation of California and an adjunct lecturer at San Francisco State University. In 2015, she cofounded Sahiyo, a transnational organization with the mission to empower Asian communities to end female genital cutting.

Mariya also graduated with her MFA in Creative Writing from Lesley University in 2016, where she received the 2014 Graduate School of Arts & Social Sciences Dean’s Merit Scholarship and the 2016 Lesley University Graduate Student Leadership Award. She writes both fiction and nonfiction and has contributed articles and stories to Huffington Post, The Fair Observer, Brown Girl Magazine, Solstice Literary Magazine, The Express Tribune, The San Francisco Examiner, The Flexible Persona, Cecile’s Writer’s Magazine, and more.

Christopher Kondrich

Christopher Kondrich

Christopher Kondrich is the author of Contrapuntal (Free Verse Editions, 2013), a New Measure Poetry Prize finalist. He is the winner of The Iowa Review Award for Poetry (selected by Srikanth Reddy), and The Paris-American Reading Series Prize. His new poetry appears or is forthcoming in Boston Review, Crazyhorse, Gulf Coast, Poetry Northwest, The Iowa Review, The Kenyon Review, Third Coast, Typo and Web Conjunctions. He holds an MFA from Columbia University’s School of the Arts and a PhD from the University of Denver where he was an editor for Denver Quarterly. He is an Associate Editor of 32 Poems, and an instructor for the Lighthouse Writers Workshop and Frequency Writers.

Robert Anthony Siegel

Robert Anthony Siegel

Robert Anthony Siegel is the author of two novels, All the Money in the World and All Will Be Revealed. A collection of autobiographical essays, Criminals, is forthcoming from Counterpoint Press in the summer of 2018. His short stories, essays, and journalism have appeared in The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, Smithsonian, The Paris Review, The Oxford American, and Tin House, among other venues. His web site is: www.robertanthonysiegel.com

Robbie Gamble

Robbie Gamble

Robbie Gamble holds an MFA in poetry from Lesley University. His poems have appeared or are forthcoming in The American Journal of Poetry, Naugatuck River Review, Stonecoast Review, Poet Lore, and Carve. He works as a nurse practitioner caring for homeless people in Boston, Massachusetts.

Timothy Denevi

Timothy Denevi

Timothy Denevi’s first book is Hyper (Simon & Schuster, 2014). His writing has recently appeared in The Normal School and Gulf Coast, and online in New York Magazine, The Atlantic, Time, and American Short Fiction. This summer he reported on the Republican and Democratic National Conventions for Literary Hub. He’s an assistant professor in the MFA program at George Mason University, where he teaches nonfiction. He’s currently working on a book about Hunter S. Thompson. You can follow him on Twitter at @TimDenevi.

Gianna Ward-Vetrano

Gianna Ward-Vetrano

Gianna Ward-Vetrano is a doctoral candidate in comparative literature at University of California, Berkeley, and a blogger. Her blog, The Unbearable Bookishness of Blogging (unbearablebookishness.com), has featured writing about literature, cinema, and feminism since 2013.

Dionne Ford

Dionne Ford

Dionne Ford is the author of the memoir Finding Josephine, forthcoming from Putnam, and co-editor of the anthology Shared Legacies: Narratives of Race and Reconciliation by Descendants of Slaveholders and the Enslaved, forthcoming from Rutgers University Press. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, LitHub, More, Rumpus and Ebony, and won awards from the National Association of Black Journalists and the Newswomen’s Club of New York. Most recently, she received a National Endowment for the Arts Creative Writing Fellowship for 2018.

Andrea Hollander

Andrea Hollander

Andrea Hollander is the author of four full-length poetry collections, including Landscape with Female Figure: New & Selected Poems, 1982 – 2012, a finalist for the Oregon Book Award. Her many other honors include two Pushcart Prizes, the D. H. Lawrence Fellowship, the Nicholas Roerich Poetry Prize, and two fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts. Hollander lives in Portland, Oregon, where she teaches writing workshops. Her website is www.andreahollander.net.

Ozzie Jones

Ozzie Jones

Writer, director, teacher, composer, and performer Ozzie Jones is Founder and Artistic director of the Rhythm One Company. His many directing credits include Ursula Rucker’s My Father’s Daughter at La MAMA (NYC), Langston Hughes’ Black Nativity at Theater Horizon (nominated for nine Barrymore awards, and winner of three); and Breaking Barriers for First Person Arts at Philadelphia Theater Company. Jones wrote and directed South African Nativity for Enon in Cape Town, South Africa, and wrote and performed the song “Coochie Time,” featured in Spike Lee’s Da Sweet Blood of Jesus. He directed a series of short plays written by inmates for Philadelphia FIGHT organization, and My Block is Crazy, a documentary about violence and youth produced with the United States Attorney's Office. He’s been awarded the Barrymore’s Harold Prince Award for Outstanding Direction of a Musical for Freedom Theater’s production of Black Nativity and 7Arts Magazine’s Award for rising stars. His production, in Ireland, of Othello was described by the Irish Times as “the most creative and innovative production of Shakespeare seen in Ireland in decades.” He co-wrote, provided dramaturgy, and performed in the Bessie Award-winning Rome and Jewels for Rennie Harris Pure Movement. He has directed or performed with Patti Labelle, Ruby Dee, Ntozake Shange, William Pope.L, Walter Dallas, Sonia Sanchez, Jill Scott, Guy Davis, The Roots, Wu Tang Clan, Schooly D, Public Enemy, Poor Righteous Teachers, Douglas Turner Ward, Amiri Baraka, Paul Carter Harrison, Melvin Van Peoples, Rennie Harris, etc.

Tim Kellner

Tim Kellner

Tim Kellner was born in Dresden, Germany. He was a member of the boys' choir Dresdner Kreuzchor and worked for fifteen years as a professional singer. He studied graphic design at the Fachschule fuer angewandte Kunst Heiligendamm and the University of Wismar, specializing in experimental photography. He was an intern in London for Creative Camera.

In 2004, Tim founded the Network for New Subjective Photography, co-curating the show "Refusal Of Reality" and was granted a scholarship by the city of Rostock. His received a travel grant to Australia from the Government of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern in 2005. He was the first International Visiting Research Fellow at Sydney College of the Arts in 2008. He was awarded the Rostocker Kunstpreis for photography in 2009.

Tim is a founding member of the Artist Collective SCHAUM. SCHAUM has won prizes and grants for its conceptual art, including the competition for a memorial for the pogrom of Rostock-Lichtenhagen in 2016. Tim has been exhibiting and curating shows continuously for the past 20 years throughout Germany and abroad. He teaches photography at the art school of Rostock, Germany, where he lives by the Baltic Sea.

Paul Otremba

Paul Otremba

Paul Otremba is the author of two poetry collections, The Currency (Four Way Books 2009) and Pax Americana (Four Way Books 2015). He teaches at Rice University and in the Warren Wilson low-residency MFA program.

Kate Hoyle

Kate Hoyle

Kate Hoyle is a poet and visual artist from Moraga, California. Her work has been published in The Tupelo Press 30/30 Project, Handwritten Work and Typishly. Her five poem series, On America, recently traveled the US and South America on exhibit in U2’s Joshua Tree World Tour. You can see more of her work at katehoyle.com .

Tony Mochama

Tony Mochama

Tony Mochama is a poet and lawyer-turned-journalist who is a popular columnist with The Standard Media Group, one of Kenya's big media organizations. A pioneer Morland Miles Scholar in 2014, Mochama has won multiple literary awards for his novellas, including the Burt Prize twice (2013 & 2016). Tony enjoys traveling and has been an SLS participant on three continents. He is also the author of a book of nocturnal essays about his native city, Nairobi: A Night Guide through the City in the Sun.

C.M. Mayo

C.M. Mayo

C.M. Mayo is the author of several books on Mexico, including the novel based on a true story, The Last Prince of the Mexican Empire (Unbridled Books), which was named a Library Journal Best Book of 2009, and Miraculous Air: Journey of a Thousand Miles through Baja California, the Other Mexico (Milkweed Editions), two chapters of which, as essays, won Lowell Thomas Awards. Her collection of short fiction, Sky Over El Nido (University of Georgia Press), won the Flannery O'Connor Award. A long-time resident of Mexico City and a noted translator of Mexican fiction and poetry, her translations have been widely anthologized, and she is the editor of Mexico: A Literary Traveler's Companion, a portrait of Mexico in the works of 24 Mexican writers. In 2017 she was inducted into the Texas Institute of Letters. Her website is www.cmmayo.com.

Elly Bookman

Elly Bookman

Elly Bookman’s poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in The New Yorker, American Poetry Review, The Georgia Review, The Florida Review, and elsewhere. She was the recipient of the first annual Stanley Kunitz Memorial Prize from APR and of the 2017 Loraine Williams Poetry Prize from The Georgia Review. She writes and teaches in downtown Atlanta.

Paul Goldberg

Paul Goldberg

Paul Goldberg's novel, The Chateau, will be published by Picador in February. His debut novel, The Yid, was named a finalist for both the Sami Rohr Prize for Jewish Literature and the National Jewish Book Award’s Goldberg Prize for Debut Fiction. As a reporter, Goldberg has written two books about the Soviet human rights movement, and has coauthored (with Otis Brawley) How We Do Harm, an exposé of the U.S. healthcare system. He and his wife Susan Coll live in Washington, D.C.

Joy Arbor

Joy Arbor

Joy Arbor is the author of the chapbook, Where Are You From, Originally? (Finishing Line Press). Her poems have appeared in Crab Orchard Review, Jewish Currents, and Natural Bridge, among others. She teaches at Kettering University in Flint, Michigan and gardens and delights in the antics of their chickens and ducks with her family in the country. "Not Seeing the Friend of God" is part of a longer sequence of poems based on her research on Israel-Palestine with the Compassionate Listening Project. More information can be found on her website: http://joyarbor.net.

Donna Hemans

Donna Hemans

Donna Hemans is the author of River Woman, and is working on novel set in 1930’s Cuba. In 2015, she won the Lignum Vitae Una Marson Award for Adult Literature for her manuscript, Tea by the Sea. Her stories have appeared in Vol. 1 Brooklyn, Wasafiri Online, Caribbean Writer, Crab Orchard Review, Witness, among others. She’s online at donnahemans.com.

Daisy Fried

Daisy Fried

Daisy Fried is the author of three books of poetry, Women's Poetry: Poems and Advice , My Brother is Getting Arrested Again, and She Didn't Mean to Do It, all published by University of Pittsburgh Press. She's received Guggenheim, Hodder and Pew Fellowships, is a member of the faculty of the Warren Wilson College MFA Program for Writers, and lives in Philadelphia.

Carolyn Oliver

Carolyn Oliver

A graduate of The Ohio State University and Boston University, Carolyn Oliver lives in Massachusetts with her family. Her work has appeared in Tin House’s "Open Bar," Midway Journal, America, matchbook, and Slush Pile Magazine, among other publications. Links to more of her work can be found at carolynoliver.net

Mostafa Fadi

Mostafa Fadi

Mostafa Fadi studied journalism at Aleppo University. He currently lives at PIKPA refugee camp on Lesvos Island in Greece. He hopes to receive approval for resettlement in Europe so that he can complete his training and become a journalist.

Joshua Weiner

Joshua Weiner

Joshua Weiner is the author of three books of poetry, including The Figure of a Man Being Swallowed by a Fish. He is also the editor of At the Barriers: On the Poetry of Thom Gunn (all from Chicago). His most recent book, Berlin Notebook, prose about the refugee crisis, was published by the Los Angeles Review of Books (2016), and funded by a Guggenheim fellowship. His poems and essays have appeared in Best American Poetry, The New York Review of Books, The Nation, The American Scholar, The New Republic, Brick, Threepenny Review, and elsewhere. He is professor of English at the University of Maryland, and lives with his family in Washington D.C.

Peg Alford Pursell

Peg Alford Pursell

Peg Alford Pursell is the author of Show Her a Flower, A Bird, A Shadow, a collection of fiction and hybrid prose featured by Poets & Writers magazine’s second annual 5 over 50. Her second book, A GIRL GOES INTO THE FOREST, is forthcoming from Dzanc Books in 2019. Her work has appeared in Permafrost, the Los Angeles Review, Joyland Magazine, and other journals and anthologies. She is the founder and director of the national reading series Why There Are Words and of WTAW Press.

Colleen Quinn

Colleen Quinn

Colleen Quinn’s short fiction has appeared in Spinetingler Magazine, The Brooklyn Rail, Gemini Magazine, Betty Fedora, volumes 1-3, Holdfast Magazine, and Bellevue Literary Review. Her work was also included in the anthology Behind the Yellow Wallpaper: New Tales of Madness, published by New Lit Salon Press in the spring of 2014, and in the Black Is the New Black anthology, published by Wordland in 2015. She currently resides in Brooklyn, New York, and her work may be found at www.colleenquinn.com.

Priya Balasubramanian

Priya Balasubramanian

Priya Balasubramanian is a physician and writer. She has recently completed a novel, The Alchemy of Secrets, set in Bangalore, India, which is her childhood home. She now lives in Gold River, California, with her husband and two children.

Rion Amilcar Scott

Rion Amilcar Scott

Rion Amilcar Scott’s short story collection, Insurrections (University Press of Kentucky, 2016) was awarded the 2017 PEN/Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction. His work has been published in The Kenyon Review, Crab Orchard Review, PANK, The Rumpus, Fiction International, and Confrontation, among others. Presently, he teaches English at Bowie State University.

Rachel León

Rachel León

Rachel León is a writer, activist, and social worker. She is a contributor for Chicago Review of Books and a Fiction Editor for Arcturus. She interns for a literary agent and is currently working on a novel.

Nikki Stavile

Nikki Stavile

Nikki Stavile, an MFA Candidate at Hollins University, holds a Bachelors in English and Creative Writing from Emory University and a Masters of Letters in Modern and Contemporary Literature and Culture from the University of St. Andrews, Scotland, where she was a Robert T. Jones Scholar. When she is not working on her speculative fiction novel or reading frustrating political commentaries, she enjoys long distance running, being vegan, and playing a bard in her Dungeons and Dragons campaign. She likes people who vote.

Shikhandin

Shikhandin

Shikhandin is an Indian writer whose book of short stories Immoderate Men was published by Speaking Tiger Books, India earlier in 2017. Her first children's book, a prize winning manuscript, is forthcoming from Duckbill Books, India. Shikhandin was first runner up in The Katha Short Story Contest (USA) and DNA-OOP Short Story Contest (India) in 2016. In 2012, she won first prize in the Anam Cara Short Story Prize (Ireland). Her other accolades include being on the long list of the 2006 Bridport Poetry Prize (UK), being a finalist in the 2010 Aesthetica Poetry Contest (UK), and being a pushcart nominee in 2011 by Cha: An Asian Literary Journal. Her poetry and fiction have been published worldwide. Before she became Shikhandin, her first novel--Culling Mynahs and Crows--was published in 2014 by Lifi Publications, India.

Michael Downs

Michael Downs

The Strange and True Tale of Horace Wells, Surgeon Dentist, Michael Downs's debut novel, will be published by Acre Books in May 2018. It marks his third book set in his hometown of Hartford, Connecticut. Others include The Greatest Show: Stories (LSU Press, 2012) and House of Good Hope: A Promise for a Broken City (University of Nebraska Press, 2007), which won the River Teeth Literary Nonfiction Prize. Among his awards are fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Maryland State Arts Council, and the Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance. A former newspaper reporter, Downs is an associate professor of English at Towson University. He lives and writes in Baltimore.

Tom Carson

Tom Carson

Tom Carson won two National Magazine Awards during his stint as Esquire's "Screen" columnist and was nominated twice more for his work as GQ's "The Critic." He is the author of two novels: Gilligan's Wake (a New York Times Notable Book of The Year for 2003) and Daisy Buchanan's Daughter.

Eleanor Wilner

Eleanor Wilner

Eleanor Wilner has published more poems than she, or anyone, cares to remember. She is frequently a visiting poet, a temporary role she enjoys, as she is excused from department meetings, can cut to the chase with students, and get out of town ahead of the sheriff. As to basket weaving in a bad time, think what it did for baby Moses.

E. McCurdy

E. McCurdy

Elmer McCurdy, shot dead in 1911 after a failed train robbery outside of Pawhuska, Oklahoma, went on to have a more successful afterlife as a dead celebrity outlaw and traveling carnival mummy --and he made a cameo appearance in at least one exploitation film--before being lost to history. His body was later rediscovered in 1976, hanging inside a spook-house carnival ride that was being used as a set for an episode of The Six Million Dollar Man television show in Long Beach, California. Identified by the L.A. County Coroner's Office as John Doe #255, he was eventually identified by a team of amateur historians and the forensic anthropologist Clyde Snow and finally buried, with some fanfare (it made The CBS Evening News) 66 years after his demise, in Guthrie, Oklahoma, under a six foot block of concrete.

Dawn Potter

Dawn Potter

Dawn Potter directs the Frost Place Conference on Poetry and Teaching, held each summer at Robert Frost's home in Franconia, New Hampshire. She is the author of seven books of prose and poetry, sings and plays fiddle in the band Doughty Hill, and lives in Portland, Maine.

Mary Morris

Mary Morris

Mary Morris is the author of fifteen books--seven novels, including most recently The Jazz Palace (Nan A. Talese/Doubleday), three collections of short stories, and four travel memoirs, including the travel classic, Nothing to Declare: Memoirs of a Woman Traveling Alone. Her numerous short stories, articles, and travel essays have appeared in such places as The Atlantic, Narrative, The Paris Review, and The New York Times. Morris is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship and the Rome Prize in Literature. In 2016, The Jazz Palace was awarded the Anisfield-Wolf Award for fiction. This prize goes to a literary work that addresses the issues of racism and cultural diversity. Her new novel, Gateway to the Moon, will be published in April 2018 by Nan A. Talese/Doubleday. For more information go to marymorris.net.

Helen Klein Ross

Helen Klein Ross

Helen Klein Ross is a poet and novelist whose work has appeared in The New Yorker, The New York Times and The Iowa Review where it won the 2014 Iowa Review award in poetry. She is the creator and editor of The Traveler's Vade Mecum, an anthology of new poems prompted by old telegrams, published October 2016 by Red Hen Press. Her latest novel is What Was Mine published in January 2016 by Simon & Schuster. She lives (and marches) in NYC and Salisbury, CT.

Ian Randall Wilson

Ian Randall Wilson

Ian Randall Wilson's first collection, Ruthless Heaven, will be published by Finishing Line Press in 2017. He has previously published two chapbooks, Theme of the Parabola and The Wilson Poems. His fiction and poetry have appeared in The Gettysburg Review and Alaska Quarterly Review. He has an MFA in Fiction and in Poetry from Warren Wilson College. By day, he is an executive at Sony Pictures Entertainment.

Sarah Stone

Sarah Stone

“Invisible Theater” is a standalone excerpt from Sarah Stone’s new novel Hungry Ghost Theater, forthcoming October 1 from WTAW Press. Her previous novel, The True Sources of the Nile, was a BookSense 76 selection, has been translated into German and Dutch, and was included in Geoff Wisner’s A Basket of Leaves: 99 Books That Capture the Spirit of Africa. She’s the coauthor, with her spouse and writing partner Ron Nyren, of the textbook Deepening Fiction: A Practical Guide for Intermediate and Advanced Writers. Her stories, essays, and reviews have appeared in Ploughshares; StoryQuarterly; The Believer; The Millions; The Writer’s Chronicle; Dedicated to the People of Darfur: Writings on Fear, Risk, and Hope; and A Kite in the Wind: Fiction Writers on Their Craft, among other places. She teaches creative writing for the Warren Wilson MFA Program for Writers and Stanford Continuing Studies. For more information, visit her online at www.sarahstoneauthor.com.

Karen Shepard

Karen Shepard

Karen Shepard is a Chinese-American born and raised in New York City. She is the author of four novels, An Empire of Women (2000), The Bad Boy’s Wife (2004), Don’t I Know You? (2009), and The Celestials (2013), which was short-listed for the Massachusetts Book Award and the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing. Her collection of short stories, Kiss Me Someone, was published in September. Her short fiction has been published in The Atlantic Monthly, Tin House, One Story, and Ploughshares, among others. Her nonfiction has appeared in O Magazine, Buzzfeed, More, Self, USA Today, and The Boston Globe, among others. She has received the William Goyen-Doris Roberts Fellowship for Fiction from the Christopher Isherwood Foundation, was a National Magazine Award Finalist, and was a recipient of a Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist Grant. She teaches writing and literature at Williams College in Williamstown, MA, where she lives with her husband, novelist Jim Shepard, and their three children.

Jim Shepard

Jim Shepard

Jim Shepard has written seven novels, including The Book of Aron, which won the Sophie Brody Medal for Excellence in Jewish Literature, the Harold Ribalow Award for Jewish Literature, the PEN/New England Award for Fiction, and the Clark Fiction Prize, and five story collections, including Like You’d Understand, Anyway, a finalist for the National Book Award and Story Prize winner, and most recently The World to Come. Six of his stories have been chosen for the Best American Short Stories, two for the PEN/O. Henry Prize Stories, and two for Pushcart Prizes. He’s also won the Library of Congress/ Massachusetts Book Award for Fiction, the ALEX Award from the American Library Association, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. He teaches at Williams College.

David Keplinger

David Keplinger

David Keplinger is the author of five collections of poetry, most recently Another City (Milkweed, 2018). His collaborative translations with the German poet Jan Wagner, The Art of Topiary, was published by Milkweed in 2017. With the Danish poet Carsten René Nielsen, Keplinger has translated World Cut Out with Crooked Scissors (New Issues, 2007) and House Inspections (BOA, 2011). Keplinger has won the T.S. Eliot Prize, the Colorado Book Award, the Cavafy Prize, and other honors, and he has received NEA fellowships in both Literature and Literary Translation. He teaches in the MFA Program at American University in Washington, D.C.

Cristiane Mohallem

Cristiane Mohallem

Cristiane Mohallem is a Brazilian artist living in São Paulo. She received a degree in Clinical Psychology from the Catholic University of São Paulo in 2000. For seven years, she coordinated a Play, Art, and Therapy program at Rim e Hipertensão Hospital, UNIFESP. This project led her to the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, where she earned a MAAT in 2008. There she discovered the world of visual arts, and developed a special interested in painting ateliers. In 2012, she held her first solo exhibition at the DConcept Escritório de Arte in São Paulo. In 2014, she stopped working as a psychotherapist to focus exclusively on her art studio work. Her visual works have been exhibited in Brazil, the United States, Germany and Italy.

Her works seeks the essence of natural elements—mangrove, tree, stone, animal—through the language of embroidering and drawing.